Category Archives: English

Prenade: A dried Fruit Sauce/Dip

This sauce goes with the previous post, Losenges. It is a yummy dip that was served with the fried losenges. In case anyone missed the source info, here it is again:

The original recipe is in “Take a Thousand Eggs or More” volume 1 (1). It is contained within the Harleian Manuscript written in c.1450 and is housed in Oxford University. The  recipes are from Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books, edited by Thomas Austin, published for the Early English Text Society by the Oxford University Press, first published in 1888 and reprinted in 1964 by Vivian Ridler.

Original Recipe (1 & 2)

“Prenade: Take wyn, and put hit in a potty, and clarified honey, sanders, powder of paper, canel, clowes, maces, saffron, pynes, minced dates, & reysons. And cast Þer to a litul vinegre, and settle hit ouer the fire, and lete hit boyle; and seth figges in wyn and grynde hem, and draw hem Þorgh a streynour, and cast Þereto, and let boile all togidre……”

This original recipe goes on to say how to make “faire kakes” to serve with this sauce. In this post I wanted to make the sauce to serve with the losenges.

Transcription

“Prenade: Take wine, and put it in a pot, and clarified honey, sandelwood, pepper, cinnamon, cloves, mace, saffron, pinenuts, minced dates, & raisins. And cast thereto a little vinegar, and set it over the fire, and let it boil; and seeth figs in wine and grind them, and draw them through a strainer, and cast thereto, and let boil all together…”

My Redaction

  • 2 cups Red Wine
  • 4 tbsp. Honey
  • 1/4 cup Pitted, Minced Dates
  • 1/4 cup Pinenuts
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1/2 cup Dried Figs
  • 4 Cloves, ground
  • 1/2 tsp Mace
  • 1 tsp. Sandelwood, optional (It adds a beautiful purple color but an off flavor)
  • Pepper to taste
  • 1/2 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1-2 Threads Saffron
  • 2 tbsp. Red Wine Vinegar
  • Fried Losenges

In a pot bring 1 cup of wine to a boil and pour over dried fig. Let stand 20 minutes until the figs soften and start to plump up.

Take dried dates and mince them. Heat remaining wine and add the honey, pepper, cinnamon, cloves, mace, saffron, pinenuts, dates and raisins. Add the vinegar and bring to a boil.

Take figs with their liquid and mash with a fork until it resembles a loose homogenous paste. Add this to the spiced wine mixture and cook until the mixture is as thick as you would like. Keep in mind that it will thicken up a little more as it cools.

Bibliography

  1. Renfrow, Cindy. Take a Thousand Eggs of More: a Collection of 15th Century Recipes. 1998.
  2. Austin, Thomas. Two Fifteenth Century Cookery-Books — Harleian MS279 (1430) & Harleian MS4016 (1450). London, Oxford Universty Press, 1888. Rpt Vivian Ridler, Printer to the University, 1964. Original serie no.91
  3. Napier, Mrs. ALexander, ed. A Noble Book off Cookry for a Prynce Houssolde or Eny Other Estately Houssolde. c. 1467. Reprinted verbatim from a rare MS in the Holkham Collection. Elliot Stock. London, 1882.

 

Lozenges

This recipe I discovered when I was searching for an appetizer dish for a first course in a luncheon feast I was planning. They are the medieval equivalent of chips and are serve with Prenade, a dipping sauce made mostly of dried fruit.

MEDIEVAL CHIPS AND DIP! WHO WOULD HAVE THOUGHT!

The original recipe is in “Take a Thousand Eggs or More” volume 1 (1). It is contained within the Harleian Manuscript written in c.1450 and is housed in Oxford University. The  recipes are from Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books, edited by Thomas Austin, published for the Early English Text Society by the Oxford University Press, first published in 1888 and reprinted in 1964 by Vivian Ridler.

Originals

 Harleian MS(2)

“134 Take floure, water, saffron, sugur, and salt, and make fyne paast þer-of, and faire thyn kakes; and kutte hem like losenges, and fry hem in fyne oile, and serue hem forthe hote in a dissh in lenten tyme”

Translation

134 Take flour, water, saffron, sugar, and salt and make fine paste there-of, and faire thin cakes; and cut them like lozenges (diamonds), and fry them in fine oil and serve them forth hot in a dish in lenten time.

A Noble Book of Cookery (3)

“To make lossenges fried in lent make a paiste of pured flour knodden with faire water sugur saffron and salt then mak a thyn foil in lossenges the bred of your hond or lese and fry  them in oil and serue them iij or iiij in a dyshe”

Translation

To make lozenges fried in lent. Make a paste of pure flour sodden with faire water, sugar, saffron, and salt. Then make a thin sheet of diamonds the breadth of your hand or less and fry them in oil and serve them 3 or 4 to a dish.

My Redaction

  • 1 cup FLour
  • 1 tbsp Sugar
  • 1/4 cup  + 1 tbsp boiling water
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1-2 threads saffron

Infuse the saffron in the boiling water. Mix together the dry ingredients. Add saffron mixture to the dry ingredients and stir until blended. When it is cool enough to handle, knead the dough for about 10 minutes. Cover and let the dough rest about 10 minutes.

Roll the dough as thin as possible and baste with a very small amout of oil so the do not stick to each other as you continue working the dough. After oiling the sheet of dough cut into diamond shaped pieces and place aside until all the dough is rolled and cut into diamonds.

Heat oil in deep frying pan. When hot but not too hot (no more than 350º) fry the pieces until puffed and golden, approximately 2 minutes. Flip and fry on the other side. Take them out and drain on paper towels.

Optional: Immediately after being taken out of the oil you can salt them. This makes them a little more modern and they still taste good with the prenade.

These are delicious! They go fast at parties so be sure you make enough!

 

Bibliography

  1. Renfrow, Cindy. Take a Thousand Eggs of More: a Collection of 15th Century Recipes. 1998.
  2. Austin, Thomas. Two Fifteenth Century Cookery-Books — Harleian MS279 (1430) & Harleian MS4016 (1450). London, Oxford Universty Press, 1888. Rpt Vivian Ridler, Printer to the University, 1964. Original serie no.91
  3. Napier, Mrs. ALexander, ed. A Noble Book off Cookry for a Prynce Houssolde or Eny Other Estately Houssolde. c. 1467. Reprinted verbatim from a rare MS in the Holkham Collection. Elliot Stock. London, 1882.